From The Blog

E-mail Print PDF

Kinesiologists have determined, according to a report in a July 2014 issue of Time magazine, that human beings can run a race of one hundred meters no faster than 9.29 seconds.  This time is actually 15/100 second faster than a reporter for the BBC determined after consultations with mathematicians in 2012.  The terminus in racing time is determined by the laws of physics and the limitations of human anatomy.  This means that as athletes continue to reach the maximum of human potential, such races will be increasingly closer, with the winner outpacing his or her rivals by only thousandths of seconds.  To the observer, the race may be thrilling but the speed at which the athletes actually run will be entirely lost without context.

Read more...
E-mail Print PDF

Proponents of Judaism often cite the fact that Judaism conforms to the highest and noblest ethical standards.  Indeed, there is so much to support this contention in the Torah itself.  For instance, the Torah demands the use of fair weights and measures and honest business practices (Leviticus 19:35-36) and fair treatment of servants and workers (Exodus 22:26; Deuteronomy 24:14-15).  The Torah insists upon compassion for the disabled (Leviticus 19:14) and special treatment for widows and orphans (Exodus 22:21).  The lowly condition of the poor must be improved, not tolerated (Leviticus 19:9-10) and even the poverty stricken must be treated with dignity (Exodus 22:24-26).  The Torah insists upon equal justice under the law (Exodus 23:3, 6-8; Numbers 15:15-16; Deuteronomy 16:19-20) and even love of strangers (Leviticus 19:34) as well as neighbors (Leviticus 19:18).  Human life must be preserved (Leviticus 19:16) and animals, too, must be treated compassionately (Exodus 22:4; Deuteronomy 22:6-7).  The Torah demands giving attention to public safety (Exodus 21:33-34; Deuteronomy 22:8) and to environmental issues as well (Exodus 23:10-11; Deuteronomy 20:19).  Not only did these rules set Israel apart from its ancient neighbors, it makes Judaism appear progressive even today.

But critics of the Torah in particular and Judaism in general are not entirely convinced; primarily because of passages that paint a picture of cruelty rather than nobility.

Read more...

Words to live by

We’re all so busy chasing the extraordinary that we forget to stop and be grateful for the ordinary.

- Professor Brené Brown